Discussion:
Cold head wear
(too old to reply)
MH
2009-11-16 16:23:18 UTC
Permalink
I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.

I was looking around for winter head wear and
watched this very interesting video --

Cold Weather Headgear by U.S. Cavalry (7:41)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg7H6h4D1Ng

The balaclavas are reasonably priced I think
http://www.uscav.com/category.aspx?catid=1515

I like the Polarex® 6-In-1 Fleece Hood $10
with several colors to choose from.
http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?productID=17892

Happy bicycling and stay warm,
-Mark Hoagy
Mark Boyd
2009-11-16 16:47:10 UTC
Permalink
Just be sure to get a thin balaclava. Heads give off an amazing amount
of heat and, for me, even a medium weigh balaclava is way too hot
while bicycling.

My favorite balaclava is made of silk.

Mark



On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:23 AM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
> I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.
>
> I was looking around for winter head wear and
> watched this very interesting video --
>
> Cold Weather Headgear by U.S. Cavalry (7:41)
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg7H6h4D1Ng
>
> The balaclavas are reasonably priced I think
> http://www.uscav.com/category.aspx?catid=1515
>
> I like the Polarex® 6-In-1 Fleece Hood $10
> with several colors to choose from.
> http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?productID=17892
>
> Happy bicycling and stay warm,
> -Mark Hoagy
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
>
JOHN BERRY
2009-11-16 20:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Balaclavas*$@#& !!  Reminds me off the days of my youth, wandering arou
nd in a coarse wool balaclava and coarse wool underwear, brand name Utility
, logo a Pacman.  Wet, cold, Wellies full of snow, and itching like hell
from all that wool! Yukkk!  This was life in the UK, circa late 1940s. 
=0A=0AAlso, I thought it would be a good idea to have a vapor barrier in A
laska in ealry May last year and bought a pair of fishermens' relatively th
ick rubber gloves.  They seemed to cut off the circulation to my fingers:
at the very least they weren't doing any good, so I took them off.   R
esult, after coming down off the Bear Creek (?) summit into Kluane Lake at
high speed at around 11 p.m., was a mild case of frost bite from which it t
ook nearly a year to get the feeling and the strength back into my fingers
and thumbs.  Silly me!       I can tell you, you don't want t
o be trying to change a tire on an Alaskan (or any other) raodside with fro
st-bitten hands at any temerature!=0A=0AA general comment on cold weather c
ycling:  I find that I can ride all day (and am comfortable all day)  i
n  shorts and T-shirt with a light windbreaker at temperatures near 32
degrees, even in fairly heavy rainfall.  The trouble seems to be, for me
(I don't  know how general this may be), that over a period of several da
ys of this my core seems to get cold, and then I reach a point where I just
can't get warm.  When I then stop camping and sleep in a warm house for
a night, I have extreme pain in the extremities and face for the whole nigh
t, while the rest of me is simultaneously sweating and shivering.  I have
been through this cycle at least three times:  the insidious part is t
hat it takes up to five days for any warning signs of this internal chillin
g to appear.=0A=0AJohn =0AJohn Berry Associates=0AGeology & Remote Sensing
=0A5000 Beverly Hills Dr.=0AAUSTIN, TX 78731=0A+1-512-921-1472 (cell)=0Ajlb
assoc-***@public.gmane.org =0A=0A=0AJust be sure to get a thin balaclava. Heads give o
ff an amazing amount=0Aof heat and, for me, even a medium weigh balaclava i
s way too hot=0Awhile bicycling.=0A=0AMy favorite balaclava is made of silk
.=0A=0A            Mark=0A=0A=0A=0AOn Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 11:2
3 AM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:=0A> I'm not to up on all this stu
ff for winter headgear=0A> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all w
ear.=0A>=0A> I was looking around for winter head wear and=0A> watched this
very interesting video --=0A>=0A> Cold Weather Headgear by U.S. Cavalry (7
:41)=0A> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg7H6h4D1Ng=0A>=0A> The balaclava
s are reasonably priced I think=0A> http://www.uscav.com/category.aspx?cati
d=1515=0A>=0A> I like the Polarex® 6-In-1 Fleece Hood $10=0A> with seve
ral colors to choose from.=0A> http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?produc
tID=17892=0A>=0A> Happy bicycling and stay warm,=0A> -Mark Hoagy=0A> ____
___________________________________________=0A> Touring mailing list=0A> To
uring-***@public.gmane.org=0A> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikeli
st.org=0A> Unsubscribe or list settings:=0A> http://www.phred.org/mailman/o
ptions/touring=0A>=0A_______________________________________________=0ATour
ing mailing list=0ATouring-***@public.gmane.org=0ABrowse and search the archives: h
ttp://search.bikelist.org=0AUnsubscribe or list settings:=0Ahttp://www.phre
d.org/mailman/options/touring=0A
Patrick Davis
2009-11-16 20:50:19 UTC
Permalink
JOHN BERRY wrote:
> The trouble seems to be, for me
> (I don't know how general this may be), that over a period of several da
> ys of this my core seems to get cold, and then I reach a point where I just
> can't get warm. When I then stop camping and sleep in a warm house for
> a night, I have extreme pain in the extremities and face
John, the solution seems obvious: Cycle Hawaii

:-)
Pat
Ablejack Courtney
2009-11-17 00:09:01 UTC
Permalink
Merino or cashmere wool.  They don't itch at all.  Look at Ibex, Smartw
ool, or Arcteryx.  In addition to balaclavas they also offer skull cap /
neck gaiter combos which I find more versatile and comfortable.  Especial
ly with a helmet.  Ibex also has a smart merino cycling cap.
http://www.ibexwear.com/shop/product/1435/8742/unisex-coppi-merino-cycling-
cap

--- On Mon, 11/16/09, JOHN BERRY <jlbassoc-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

Balaclavas*$@#& !!  Reminds me off the days of my youth, wandering arou
nd in a coarse wool balaclava and coarse wool underwear.=0A=0A=0A

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MH
2009-11-17 00:23:26 UTC
Permalink
I dress for the cold - not undress for shivering sakes.
Just why in the world would someone go cycling in their
Fruit of the Looms in 32 degree F temperatures is just
plain fr&^*x@! nuts. You young ones sure take the cake.
I'd rather have itchy woolens on then freeze my hinder off.
Jiminy Crickets . . .
JOHN BERRY
2009-11-17 04:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Mark (Hoagy):=0A=0AI have far more problems with overheating than with gett
ing too cold, and am horribly allergic to wool, feathers (including down) a
nd fur of any kind.   Any activity in temperatures over 60 deg F is v
ery debilitating for me unless I have trained extensively, and I have had
to go to the EMS tent after running and walking a marathon in 70 F temps
 (for my first 18 years I was lucky to ever experience a temperature much
over 60 F).  I have lived in shorts and T-shirts since I was a teenager
(except for when I was in the office (which was not often) or at some o
ther "dress-up" occasion.=0A=0AThe only trouble I have with cold is this in
sidious cooling of the core temperature that takes several days of riding i
n temperatures that are not really uncomfortable for me.  =0A=0ABy the wa
y, I'm not that young - coming up rapidly on 70.=0A John Berry Associates
=0AGeology & Remote Sensing=0A5000 Beverly Hills Dr.=0AAUSTIN, TX 78731=0A+
1-512-921-1472 (cell)=0Ajlbassoc-***@public.gmane.org =0A=0A=0A=0A----- Original Messa
ge ----=0AFrom: MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org>=0ATo: JOHN BERRY <***@fla
sh.net>=0ACc: boyd-+pm+***@public.gmane.org; Touring <touring-***@public.gmane.org>=0ASent: Mon, No
vember 16, 2009 6:23:26 PM=0ASubject: Re: Cold head wear, also "rubber" glo
ves=0A=0AI dress for the cold - not undress for shivering sakes.=0AJust why
in the world would someone go cycling in their=0AFruit of the Looms in 32
degree F temperatures is just=0Aplain fr&^*x@! nuts.  You young ones sure
take the cake.=0AI'd rather have itchy woolens on then freeze my hinder of
f.=0AJiminy Crickets . . .=0A
MH
2009-11-17 11:07:43 UTC
Permalink
John,
One of my neighbors might be similar to you in some ways.
During the summer he won't leave the air conditioned house
unless its below 77F. He'll stay inside with only shorts
on. I may see him during the morning hours tricycling to
and from the stores or socializing. The other three seasons
I can find him peddling all around our towns countryside.
He can stand up to subfreezing temperatures much better than
I can with less clothing on. Its very rare for him to complain
about cold temperatures during our winter riding sessions.

-Mark Hoagy

JOHN BERRY wrote:
> Mark (Hoagy):
>
> I have far more problems with overheating than with getting too cold, and am horribly allergic to wool, feathers (including down) and fur of any kind. Any activity in temperatures over 60 deg F is very debilitating for me unless I have trained extensively, and I have had to go to the EMS tent after running and walking a marathon in 70 F temps (for my first 18 years I was lucky to ever experience a temperature much over 60 F). I have lived in shorts and T-shirts since I was a teenager (except for when I was in the office (which was not often) or at some other "dress-up" occasion.
>
> The only trouble I have with cold is this insidious cooling of the core temperature that takes several days of riding in temperatures that are not really uncomfortable for me.
>
> By the way, I'm not that young - coming up rapidly on 70.
Reinhart Bigl
2009-11-16 17:18:07 UTC
Permalink
I use a polyester skull cap similar to this one...and it works well in all
but the coldest days:
http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id=8455244
42630869&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302885010&bmUID=1258391795803

> Date: Mon, 16 Nov 2009 10:23:18 -0600
> From: hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org
> To: touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Subject: Cold head wear
>
> I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.
>
> I was looking around for winter head wear and
> watched this very interesting video --
>
> Cold Weather Headgear by U.S. Cavalry (7:41)
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg7H6h4D1Ng
>
> The balaclavas are reasonably priced I think
> http://www.uscav.com/category.aspx?catid=1515
>
> I like the Polarex® 6-In-1 Fleece Hood $10
> with several colors to choose from.
> http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?productID=17892
>
> Happy bicycling and stay warm,
> -Mark Hoagy
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring

_________________________________________________________________
Windows Live: Keep your friends up to date with what you do online.
http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9691815


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John Bratton
2009-11-16 17:54:29 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 9:23 AM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
> I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.

I find a buff to be really useful.
http://buyabuff.com/
I've got the original. I see they have merino wool ones, now, too.
Probably quite nice.

I find that a buff (or two) in combination with a smartwool neck
gaiter keep me comfortable in temperatures down to the high single
digits F. It is really handy to have something that will fit under
your helmet without having to adjust the straps.
James Blair
2009-11-16 18:01:48 UTC
Permalink
MH < wrote:
>> I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
>> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.

Merino wool skull cap in fall and spring ( 32 to 60 F)
http://www.boure.com/8456.html


Merino wool cycling cap for cold weather.
http://www.boure.com/8455.html

Jim
MH
2009-11-16 19:34:50 UTC
Permalink
I really enjoyed watching the videos of the BUFF.
John, don't your ears get cold during the below
freezing temperatures? I start wearing my winter
polar fleece cap below 45F since I have very little
hair on top or at least not enough to keep the roof
covered. That skull cap setup is my favorite or the
mask for dusty conditions. I'll keep the BUFF in
mind come springtime.

Thank you,
-Mark Hoagy

John Bratton wrote:
> I find a buff to be really useful.
> http://buyabuff.com/
> I've got the original. I see they have merino wool ones, now, too.
> Probably quite nice.
>
> I find that a buff (or two) in combination with a smartwool neck
> gaiter keep me comfortable in temperatures down to the high single
> digits F. It is really handy to have something that will fit under
> your helmet without having to adjust the straps.
John Bratton
2009-11-17 02:16:19 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 12:34 PM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
> I really enjoyed watching the videos of the BUFF.
> John, don't your ears get cold during the below
> freezing temperatures?

I wear the buff so the ears are covered, and they stay warm enough.If
you pull the thing thief-stocking-like over your face and head, and
then pull the part over your face down around your neck, you can wear
it like a balaclava.
Wayne Estes
2009-11-16 19:40:40 UTC
Permalink
Mark Boyd wrote:

Just be sure to get a thin balaclava. Heads give off an amazing amount
of heat and, for me, even a medium weigh balaclava is way too hot
while bicycling.

Wayne replies:

Yes! My Windstopper Balaclava is only comfortable when the mercury is
below 10F (-12C). I never use it. Instead I use a super-thin polyester
balaclava which is great in the 20F to 40F range (-7C to +5C). It fits
easily in my helmet and it's porous enough that it's not soaked with
sweat at the end of the ride.

I generally don't use a balaclava unless the temperature is below 35F.
But for most of the winter my ears are covered with "Dog Earz".

http://www.amazon.com/Rox-Black-Earz-Helmet-Covers/dp/B001GSMMHY

They're triangular ear covers that attach to the helmet chin strap.
Once attached to the helmet they go on "automatically". No loose small
items to lose or forget. They are very expensive for what you get, but
it's possible to make your own.

Wayne Estes
Oakland, Oregon, USA
. dkoloko
2009-11-16 20:24:42 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, Nov 16, 2009 at 2:40 PM, Wayne Estes <w9ae-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
> They're triangular ear covers that attach to the helmet chin strap. Once
> attached to the helmet they go on "automatically". No loose small items to
> lose or forget. They are very expensive for what you get, but it's
> possible to make your own.
>
> Wayne Estes
>

What I use, plus Gore-Tex helmet cover, no cap under helmet. I cycle all
year. Expense I won't comment on; there are several manufacturers.

Demetri


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James Blair
2009-11-16 20:26:58 UTC
Permalink
Wayne wrote
They are very expensive for what you get, but it's possible to make your
own.

My sister is a knitter and she has made a couple of wool sets of ear warmers
for me.
They slide onto the chin strap and a small flap with a piece of velcro
secures them to the head strap of the helmet.

A pattern might exist online.
Jim
Nom Depost
2009-11-17 00:16:20 UTC
Permalink
MH wrote:
> I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.

1. you got to go out there & screw-up a few times to see what work & don't
work, for you. i'd guess that there's a good chance, better than 50%, it
won't kill you.

2. while i have various head covers, i've had good success using a simple
bandanna. sometimes i'll tie it to cover my ears, sometimes not.

3. i had my last summer haircut over 2 months ago, #3 top/#2 sides. longer
hair works.

4. every now & than when flushed with cash, i'll consider getting a
BMX-skate boarder helmet. most have fewer vents & more back of head
coverage, it's got to be warmer. (plus you get the cool FOAD stickers!)

5. someone mentioned Vaseline and jarred my memory: i use an oil,
baby/olive(*)/jojoba/canola/whatever on my face, legs, hands, feet. it'll
function like a VB. in keeping with the list, maybe i should get some lanolin.

(*olive oil gets old fast so i buy a bottle once a month and use the older
stuff for anointing.)
MH
2009-11-17 00:34:13 UTC
Permalink
Several years ago I made a face mask & mittens out of
windproof polar fleece. It worked nice for my winter
weather conditions. But they've disappeared. I don't
have anymore material so I'm figuring on buying the
products ready made this time around. Maybe I won't
misplace them if I pay the extra bucks or maybe I'm
just getting lazy. It sure is fun hearing what you
all wear. -Mark Hoagy


Nom Depost wrote:
> 1. you got to go out there & screw-up a few times to see what work & don't
> work, for you. i'd guess that there's a good chance, better than 50%, it
> won't kill you.
>
> 2. while i have various head covers, i've had good success using a simple
> bandanna. sometimes i'll tie it to cover my ears, sometimes not.
>
> 3. i had my last summer haircut over 2 months ago, #3 top/#2 sides. longer
> hair works.
>
> 4. every now & than when flushed with cash, i'll consider getting a
> BMX-skate boarder helmet. most have fewer vents & more back of head
> coverage, it's got to be warmer. (plus you get the cool FOAD stickers!)
>
> 5. someone mentioned Vaseline and jarred my memory: i use an oil,
> baby/olive(*)/jojoba/canola/whatever on my face, legs, hands, feet. it'll
> function like a VB. in keeping with the list, maybe i should get some lanolin.
>
> (*olive oil gets old fast so i buy a bottle once a month and use the older
> stuff for anointing.)
>
MH
2009-11-17 01:55:24 UTC
Permalink
Nom Depost wrote:
> 1. you got to go out there & screw-up a few times to see what work & don't
> work, for you. i'd guess that there's a good chance, better than 50%, it
> won't kill you.

Your right Nom!
It didn't kill me but defrosting after playing outdoors in
subfreezing temps all day was very painful. First I came
inside and removed my boots & socks just in time for my
brother to open the door and nearly rip off my big toenail.
I called Mom and she yanked it off. Then she noticed I
didn't scream bloody murder and my ears had blasters all
over them. Dad had me undress and jump in the bathtub
to warm up. When my frozen feet and ears began to thaw
there was some serious tingling PAIN. Mom drained my
blistered ears and for a week or so they dried up and
looked like cauliflower. It never happened again.
Once was enough. -Mark Hoagy
David Whitmon
2009-11-17 02:26:58 UTC
Permalink
I remember coming back from a day of frozen pond riding and having to
stand under a hot shower just to remove the balaclava that had become
one in a mass of ice with my beard.

Fun was had by one and all.

David

On Nov 16, 2009, at 8:55 PM, MH wrote:

> Nom Depost wrote:
>> 1. you got to go out there & screw-up a few times to see what
>> work & don't work, for you. i'd guess that there's a good chance,
>> better than 50%, it won't kill you.
>
> Your right Nom!
> It didn't kill me but defrosting after playing outdoors in
> subfreezing temps all day was very painful. First I came
> inside and removed my boots & socks just in time for my
> brother to open the door and nearly rip off my big toenail.
> I called Mom and she yanked it off. Then she noticed I
> didn't scream bloody murder and my ears had blasters all
> over them. Dad had me undress and jump in the bathtub
> to warm up. When my frozen feet and ears began to thaw
> there was some serious tingling PAIN. Mom drained my
> blistered ears and for a week or so they dried up and
> looked like cauliflower. It never happened again.
> Once was enough. -Mark Hoagy
>
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
MH
2009-11-17 04:25:56 UTC
Permalink
I remember the first time I licked a steel post.
Mom to the rescue with a glass of warm water.
I wasn't quite so lucky the second time.
I should've learned.
Then there was the time I had a great big golf
umbrella and a two story roof to jump off of.
It worked in the cartoons, ouch.

David Whitmon wrote:
> I remember coming back from a day of frozen pond riding and having to
> stand under a hot shower just to remove the balaclava that had become
> one in a mass of ice with my beard.
>
> Fun was had by one and all.
>
> David
David Whitmon
2009-11-17 09:19:30 UTC
Permalink
Pictures?.....(-;

http://www.vorba.org/photos/winter/0whitma-r1-067-32.html

It got up to a balmy high of 5 degrees Fahrenheit that day.



On Nov 16, 2009, at 11:25 PM, MH wrote:

> I remember the first time I licked a steel post.
> Mom to the rescue with a glass of warm water.
> I wasn't quite so lucky the second time.
> I should've learned.
> Then there was the time I had a great big golf
> umbrella and a two story roof to jump off of.
> It worked in the cartoons, ouch.
>
> David Whitmon wrote:
>> I remember coming back from a day of frozen pond riding and having
>> to stand under a hot shower just to remove the balaclava that had
>> become one in a mass of ice with my beard.
>> Fun was had by one and all.
>> David
>
>
MH
2009-11-17 11:33:07 UTC
Permalink
No pictures of my childhood stunt days. Your frozen pond
riding is something my tricycling neighbor and I like doing.
It was a lot of fun on our recumbent trikes slipping and
sliding around the two lakes in our area. He knows most
everyone around ice fishing but he doesn't sip liquor
and folks out there tend to partake in spirit lifting.
I think its part of their religion or something. I know
it helps cleanse my soul when out in nature at times.
Just me and god yucking it up over a few sample tastings.
-Mark Hoagy

David Whitmon wrote:
> Pictures?.....(-;
>
> http://www.vorba.org/photos/winter/0whitma-r1-067-32.html
>
> It got up to a balmy high of 5 degrees Fahrenheit that day.
mmeiser
2009-12-07 20:40:40 UTC
Permalink
Seems to me a trike would be a tremendous amount of fun for ice fishing.

Stable and hauls a bunch.

But I'm afraid I wouldn't get much actual fishing in. :)

On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 6:33 AM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

> No pictures of my childhood stunt days. Your frozen pond
> riding is something my tricycling neighbor and I like doing.
> It was a lot of fun on our recumbent trikes slipping and
> sliding around the two lakes in our area. He knows most
> everyone around ice fishing but he doesn't sip liquor
> and folks out there tend to partake in spirit lifting.
> I think its part of their religion or something. I know
> it helps cleanse my soul when out in nature at times.
> Just me and god yucking it up over a few sample tastings.
> -Mark Hoagy
>
>
> David Whitmon wrote:
>
>> Pictures?.....(-;
>>
>> http://www.vorba.org/photos/winter/0whitma-r1-067-32.html
>>
>> It got up to a balmy high of 5 degrees Fahrenheit that day.
>>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
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David Whitmon
2009-12-07 22:43:30 UTC
Permalink
You mean like this?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cf9Y9xGCM2g&feature=channel



On Dec 7, 2009, at 3:40 PM, mmeiser wrote:

> Seems to me a trike would be a tremendous amount of fun for ice
> fishing.
>
> Stable and hauls a bunch.
>
> But I'm afraid I wouldn't get much actual fishing in. :)
>
> On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 6:33 AM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
> No pictures of my childhood stunt days. Your frozen pond
> riding is something my tricycling neighbor and I like doing.
> It was a lot of fun on our recumbent trikes slipping and
> sliding around the two lakes in our area. He knows most
> everyone around ice fishing but he doesn't sip liquor
> and folks out there tend to partake in spirit lifting.
> I think its part of their religion or something. I know
> it helps cleanse my soul when out in nature at times.
> Just me and god yucking it up over a few sample tastings.
> -Mark Hoagy
>
>
> David Whitmon wrote:
> Pictures?.....(-;
>
> http://www.vorba.org/photos/winter/0whitma-r1-067-32.html
>
> It got up to a balmy high of 5 degrees Fahrenheit that day.
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
>
mmeiser
2009-12-08 02:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Awesome. :)

On Mon, Dec 7, 2009 at 5:43 PM, David Whitmon <whitmon-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

> You mean like this?
>
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cf9Y9xGCM2g&feature=channel
>
>
>
>
> On Dec 7, 2009, at 3:40 PM, mmeiser wrote:
>
> Seems to me a trike would be a tremendous amount of fun for ice fishing.
>>
>> Stable and hauls a bunch.
>>
>> But I'm afraid I wouldn't get much actual fishing in. :)
>>
>> On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 6:33 AM, MH <hoagy-CSKG04oV0g/***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
>> No pictures of my childhood stunt days. Your frozen pond
>> riding is something my tricycling neighbor and I like doing.
>> It was a lot of fun on our recumbent trikes slipping and
>> sliding around the two lakes in our area. He knows most
>> everyone around ice fishing but he doesn't sip liquor
>> and folks out there tend to partake in spirit lifting.
>> I think its part of their religion or something. I know
>> it helps cleanse my soul when out in nature at times.
>> Just me and god yucking it up over a few sample tastings.
>> -Mark Hoagy
>>
>>
>> David Whitmon wrote:
>> Pictures?.....(-;
>>
>> http://www.vorba.org/photos/winter/0whitma-r1-067-32.html
>>
>> It got up to a balmy high of 5 degrees Fahrenheit that day.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Touring mailing list
>> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
>> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
>> Unsubscribe or list settings:
>> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
>>
>>
>


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robert clark
2009-11-17 19:12:47 UTC
Permalink
had 2 polartec skull caps , each on their own was cool , got them
sewed together double layer is fine.

but helmets don't fit , no free lunch thick and warm is bigger circumference..
Reinhart Bigl
2009-11-17 19:28:02 UTC
Permalink
perhaps the answer is to buy a larger helmet for the winter...so that one c
an fit any type of cap/weather protection one needs.
...that's as long as you don't mind looking like the Great Gazoo!!!! ;-
)

Reinhart

> Date: Tue, 17 Nov 2009 11:12:47 -0800
> Subject: Re: Cold head wear
> From: fietsbob-***@public.gmane.org
> To: touring-***@public.gmane.org
>
> had 2 polartec skull caps , each on their own was cool , got them
> sewed together double layer is fine.
>
> but helmets don't fit , no free lunch thick and warm is bigger circumfe
rence..
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring

_________________________________________________________________
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Jan 3 for only $39.99. Upgrade now!
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Andrejs Ozolins
2009-11-17 19:40:54 UTC
Permalink
Reinhart Bigl wrote:
> perhaps the answer is to buy a larger helmet for the winter...so that one c
> an fit any type of cap/weather protection one needs.
> ...that's as long as you don't mind looking like the Great Gazoo!!!!
>

Some years ago I found one of the fancy helmets on sale and it turned
out to have the little wheel on the back that you can turn to tighten
the helmet on your head. I wouldn't buy a helmet without such a feature
any more. I can now put on whatever head covering I want, put on my
helmet, and instantly adjust it to fit. No floppy loose helmets; no
headaches from squeezing into too-small helmets.

Andrejs
Ithaca, NY
mmeiser
2009-12-07 20:37:26 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 2:28 PM, Reinhart Bigl <rbigl-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:

>
> perhaps the answer is to buy a larger helmet for the winter...so that one c
> an fit any type of cap/weather protection one needs.
> ...that's as long as you don't mind looking like the Great Gazoo!!!! ;-
> )
>

Funny thing is you don't often need a thick hat to keep your head warm. In
all but the coldest conditions a simple light / thin balaclava or skull cap
will do. To much and you'll sweat like crazy, which means you'll freeze like
crazy when you stop.

In my opinion your head is one of the best ways to regulate body temp while
riding.

Regarding eyewear.

I started wearing a short brimmed cycling cap this summer to keep the sweat
out of my eyes. I find it works quite well in the cold... right up to the
point my ears start getting numb. Then it works great with a balaclava. I
guess the reason I'm suggesting it is because I hate wearing any kind of
glasses (for various reasons) and you can tip the bill down and keep the
wind out of your eyes. Keeping the cold air off the eyes is essential for
winter riding. At some point... say around 15 degrees I just have to relent
and wear glasses though. I have all types btw, cheap and expensive, but they
usually end up getting trashed in the winter so I like to keep it cheap. I
found a nice pair of saftey glasses (I think it was Walmart) that seem to be
polarized so car lights don't glare on them. I was out riding when I needed
them so I went into the store, grabbed a pair... and walked out to the
parking lot (at night) and stared at some car headlights to make sure they
had some sort of polarizer.

BTW, Anti-fog wipes for snowboarding goggles also are invlaueable. And when
it gets crazy cold... i.e . -10 it's time to switch from glasses to goggles.

Peace,

-Mike



> Reinhart
>
> > Date: Tue, 17 Nov 2009 11:12:47 -0800
> > Subject: Re: Cold head wear
> > From: fietsbob-***@public.gmane.org
> > To: touring-***@public.gmane.org
> >
> > had 2 polartec skull caps , each on their own was cool , got them
> > sewed together double layer is fine.
> >
> > but helmets don't fit , no free lunch thick and warm is bigger circumfe
> rence..
> > _______________________________________________
> > Touring mailing list
> > Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> > Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> > Unsubscribe or list settings:
> > http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Eligible CDN College & University students can upgrade to Windows 7 before
> Jan 3 for only $39.99. Upgrade now!
> http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9691819
>
>
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> ---
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> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
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Scott Ellington
2009-11-17 21:02:49 UTC
Permalink
Last year, after many years of struggling with a bike helmet, double
ear bands, helmet cover, face mask, neck gaiter, and goggles, I
bought a downhill ski helmet. (This for temperatures below about
20F/-7C.) It has adjustable vents, warm ear flaps, and it's made to
work with goggles. More expensive than most bike helmets, but it
will last forever. I just had to add some reflective tape to make it
more visible. The only problem is those days when it's too cold for
the regular bike helmet in the morning, and too warm for the ski
helmet in the afternoon. I haven't used it for touring, though:
When it's cold enough to need that helmet, there's usually too much
ice and snow around for venturing too far from my commuting route.

Scott

Scott Ellington
Madison, Wisconsin
USA
Steve Fuller
2009-11-17 21:16:21 UTC
Permalink
Ski goggles
Wool balaclava
Regular bike helmet

This works for me down to about single digits for up to 3 hours at a shot r
iding through the cornfields of Iowa all winter.

Steve

On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 3:02 PM, Scott Ellington <sdelling-+***@public.gmane.org
u<mailto:sdelling-+***@public.gmane.org>> wrote:
Last year, after many years of struggling with a bike helmet, double
ear bands, helmet cover, face mask, neck gaiter, and goggles, I
bought a downhill ski helmet. (This for temperatures below about
20F/-7C.) It has adjustable vents, warm ear flaps, and it's made to
work with goggles. More expensive than most bike helmets, but it
will last forever. I just had to add some reflective tape to make it
more visible. The only problem is those days when it's too cold for
the regular bike helmet in the morning, and too warm for the ski
helmet in the afternoon. I haven't used it for touring, though:
When it's cold enough to need that helmet, there's usually too much
ice and snow around for venturing too far from my commuting route.

Scott

Scott Ellington
Madison, Wisconsin
USA



_______________________________________________
Touring mailing list
Touring-***@public.gmane.org<mailto:Touring-***@public.gmane.org>
Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
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David Whitmon
2009-11-17 21:31:13 UTC
Permalink
Scott

Do you have a link for your down hill ski helmet.

It just might be what I'm looking for with my new bike.

Thanks

David

On Nov 17, 2009, at 4:02 PM, Scott Ellington wrote:

> Last year, after many years of struggling with a bike helmet, double
> ear bands, helmet cover, face mask, neck gaiter, and goggles, I
> bought a downhill ski helmet. (This for temperatures below about
> 20F/-7C.) It has adjustable vents, warm ear flaps, and it's made to
> work with goggles. More expensive than most bike helmets, but it
> will last forever. I just had to add some reflective tape to make it
> more visible. The only problem is those days when it's too cold for
> the regular bike helmet in the morning, and too warm for the ski
> helmet in the afternoon. I haven't used it for touring, though:
> When it's cold enough to need that helmet, there's usually too much
> ice and snow around for venturing too far from my commuting route.
>
> Scott
>
> Scott Ellington
> Madison, Wisconsin
> USA
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
Michael Anderson
2009-11-18 12:51:54 UTC
Permalink
Goggles are nice but (for me) too heavy and cut out too much vision --- I
need something extremely light with no vision obstruction and shaped in suc
h
a way as the air stream keeps them clear of fog.
>From a suggestion on the IceBike site I purchase a few pairs of VisorGogs -
http://www.fisco-elvin.com/visorgogs.html

These things are throwaway (6 or 7 bucks a pair) but they work great for
winter bike wear (they even work over eyeglasses) the lower edge rests on
your cheeks and the top edge juts away from the eyebrow area which allows
for the moving air of your passage to keep the lens clear.

Total eye protection (to include the sides) with unlimited visibility and s
o
cheap you can toss them if they get too scratched to wear (I'm still using
the pair I got a few years ago and the backups are waiting should this pair
ever fail)

Probably one of the best (and cheapest!) items I've ever bought for winter
riding.

Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: David Whitmon [mailto:whitmon-***@public.gmane.org]
Sent: Tuesday, November 17, 2009 4:31 PM
To: Scott Ellington
Cc: touring list
Subject: Cold head wear

Scott

Do you have a link for your down hill ski helmet.

It just might be what I'm looking for with my new bike.

Thanks

David

On Nov 17, 2009, at 4:02 PM, Scott Ellington wrote:

> Last year, after many years of struggling with a bike helmet, double
> ear bands, helmet cover, face mask, neck gaiter, and goggles, I
> bought a downhill ski helmet. (This for temperatures below about
> 20F/-7C.) It has adjustable vents, warm ear flaps, and it's made to
> work with goggles. More expensive than most bike helmets, but it
> will last forever. I just had to add some reflective tape to make it
> more visible. The only problem is those days when it's too cold for
> the regular bike helmet in the morning, and too warm for the ski
> helmet in the afternoon. I haven't used it for touring, though:
> When it's cold enough to need that helmet, there's usually too much
> ice and snow around for venturing too far from my commuting route.
>
> Scott
>
> Scott Ellington
> Madison, Wisconsin
> USA
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
David Whitmon
2009-11-18 13:02:44 UTC
Permalink
Hi Mike

Thanks for the input.

I ordered a new helmet last night from Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000R9JS9S/ref=ox_ya_oh_product

It has a full face shield. Seated in my velomobile the lower part of
the helmet and face shield will be tucked into the removable skirt
that closes up he cockpit opening to around my head.

It should keep me pretty toasty. We shall see....(-;

David


On Nov 18, 2009, at 7:50 AM, Michael Anderson wrote:

> Goggles are nice but (for me) too heavy and cut out too much vision
> --- I
> need something extremely light with no vision obstruction and
> shaped in such
> a way as the air stream keeps them clear of fog.
> From a suggestion on the IceBike site I purchase a few pairs of
> VisorGogs -
> http://www.fisco-elvin.com/visorgogs.html
>
> These things are throwaway (6 or 7 bucks a pair) but they work
> great for
> winter bike wear (they even work over eyeglasses) the lower edge
> rests on
> your cheeks and the top edge juts away from the eyebrow area which
> allows
> for the moving air of your passage to keep the lens clear.
>
> Total eye protection (to include the sides) with unlimited
> visibility and so
> cheap you can toss them if they get too scratched to wear (I'm
> still using
> the pair I got a few years ago and the backups are waiting should
> this pair
> ever fail)
>
> Probably one of the best (and cheapest!) items I've ever bought for
> winter
> riding.
>
> Mike
>
Michael Anderson
2009-11-18 13:12:17 UTC
Permalink
Cool! (Figuratively speaking of course)

I think you have yourself a definite sub-zero setup there - I'd just make
sure to keep the vents clear and flowing as it looks like it would steam up
like a Turkish bath if you don't have a little airflow.

Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: David Whitmon [mailto:whitmon-***@public.gmane.org]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 8:02 AM
To: Michael Anderson
Cc: touring list
Subject: Re: Cold head wear

Hi Mike

Thanks for the input.

I ordered a new helmet last night from Amazon.com.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000R9JS9S/ref=ox_ya_oh_product

It has a full face shield. Seated in my velomobile the lower part of
the helmet and face shield will be tucked into the removable skirt
that closes up he cockpit opening to around my head.

It should keep me pretty toasty. We shall see....(-;

David


On Nov 18, 2009, at 7:50 AM, Michael Anderson wrote:

> Goggles are nice but (for me) too heavy and cut out too much vision
> --- I
> need something extremely light with no vision obstruction and
> shaped in such
> a way as the air stream keeps them clear of fog.
> From a suggestion on the IceBike site I purchase a few pairs of
> VisorGogs -
> http://www.fisco-elvin.com/visorgogs.html
>
> These things are throwaway (6 or 7 bucks a pair) but they work
> great for
> winter bike wear (they even work over eyeglasses) the lower edge
> rests on
> your cheeks and the top edge juts away from the eyebrow area which
> allows
> for the moving air of your passage to keep the lens clear.
>
> Total eye protection (to include the sides) with unlimited
> visibility and so
> cheap you can toss them if they get too scratched to wear (I'm
> still using
> the pair I got a few years ago and the backups are waiting should
> this pair
> ever fail)
>
> Probably one of the best (and cheapest!) items I've ever bought for
> winter
> riding.
>
> Mike
>
David Whitmon
2009-11-18 13:45:14 UTC
Permalink
There are actually holes in the floor up front for reverse or as it
is commonly called in Velomobile lingo, "Flintstoneing."

They draw out the excess heat and allow a flow of air to come in
around the cockpit.

It's not a heated interior but I have been told that even in the
coldest of temperatures one should not over dress but rather carry a
coat in the velo.

David

On Nov 18, 2009, at 8:11 AM, Michael Anderson wrote:

> Cool! (Figuratively speaking of course)
>
> I think you have yourself a definite sub-zero setup there - I'd
> just make
> sure to keep the vents clear and flowing as it looks like it would
> steam up
> like a Turkish bath if you don't have a little airflow.
>
> Mike
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: David Whitmon [mailto:whitmon-***@public.gmane.org]
> Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 8:02 AM
> To: Michael Anderson
> Cc: touring list
> Subject: Re: Cold head wear
>
> Hi Mike
>
> Thanks for the input.
>
> I ordered a new helmet last night from Amazon.com.
>
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000R9JS9S/ref=ox_ya_oh_product
>
> It has a full face shield. Seated in my velomobile the lower part of
> the helmet and face shield will be tucked into the removable skirt
> that closes up he cockpit opening to around my head.
>
> It should keep me pretty toasty. We shall see....(-;
>
> David
>
>
> On Nov 18, 2009, at 7:50 AM, Michael Anderson wrote:
>
>> Goggles are nice but (for me) too heavy and cut out too much vision
>> --- I
>> need something extremely light with no vision obstruction and
>> shaped in such
>> a way as the air stream keeps them clear of fog.
>> From a suggestion on the IceBike site I purchase a few pairs of
>> VisorGogs -
>> http://www.fisco-elvin.com/visorgogs.html
>>
>> These things are throwaway (6 or 7 bucks a pair) but they work
>> great for
>> winter bike wear (they even work over eyeglasses) the lower edge
>> rests on
>> your cheeks and the top edge juts away from the eyebrow area which
>> allows
>> for the moving air of your passage to keep the lens clear.
>>
>> Total eye protection (to include the sides) with unlimited
>> visibility and so
>> cheap you can toss them if they get too scratched to wear (I'm
>> still using
>> the pair I got a few years ago and the backups are waiting should
>> this pair
>> ever fail)
>>
>> Probably one of the best (and cheapest!) items I've ever bought for
>> winter
>> riding.
>>
>> Mike
>>
>
Michael Anderson
2009-11-18 16:50:40 UTC
Permalink
Sorry David I wasn't clear--- I was talking about the helmet's ventilation
(to keep down visor fogging)
That's one neat ride!
Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: David Whitmon [mailto:whitmon-***@public.gmane.org]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 8:44 AM
To: Michael Anderson
Cc: 'touring list'
Subject: Re: Cold head wear

There are actually holes in the floor up front for reverse or as it
is commonly called in Velomobile lingo, "Flintstoneing."

They draw out the excess heat and allow a flow of air to come in
around the cockpit.

It's not a heated interior but I have been told that even in the
coldest of temperatures one should not over dress but rather carry a
coat in the velo.

David

On Nov 18, 2009, at 8:11 AM, Michael Anderson wrote:

> Cool! (Figuratively speaking of course)
>
> I think you have yourself a definite sub-zero setup there - I'd
> just make
> sure to keep the vents clear and flowing as it looks like it would
> steam up
> like a Turkish bath if you don't have a little airflow.
>
> Mike
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: David Whitmon [mailto:whitmon-***@public.gmane.org]
> Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 8:02 AM
> To: Michael Anderson
> Cc: touring list
> Subject: Re: Cold head wear
>
> Hi Mike
>
> Thanks for the input.
>
> I ordered a new helmet last night from Amazon.com.
>
> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000R9JS9S/ref=ox_ya_oh_product
>
> It has a full face shield. Seated in my velomobile the lower part of
> the helmet and face shield will be tucked into the removable skirt
> that closes up he cockpit opening to around my head.
>
> It should keep me pretty toasty. We shall see....(-;
>
> David
>
>
> On Nov 18, 2009, at 7:50 AM, Michael Anderson wrote:
>
>> Goggles are nice but (for me) too heavy and cut out too much vision
>> --- I
>> need something extremely light with no vision obstruction and
>> shaped in such
>> a way as the air stream keeps them clear of fog.
>> From a suggestion on the IceBike site I purchase a few pairs of
>> VisorGogs -
>> http://www.fisco-elvin.com/visorgogs.html
>>
>> These things are throwaway (6 or 7 bucks a pair) but they work
>> great for
>> winter bike wear (they even work over eyeglasses) the lower edge
>> rests on
>> your cheeks and the top edge juts away from the eyebrow area which
>> allows
>> for the moving air of your passage to keep the lens clear.
>>
>> Total eye protection (to include the sides) with unlimited
>> visibility and so
>> cheap you can toss them if they get too scratched to wear (I'm
>> still using
>> the pair I got a few years ago and the backups are waiting should
>> this pair
>> ever fail)
>>
>> Probably one of the best (and cheapest!) items I've ever bought for
>> winter
>> riding.
>>
>> Mike
>>
>
Scott Ellington
2009-11-17 22:13:51 UTC
Permalink
On Nov 17, 2009, at 3:29 PM, David Whitmon wrote:

> Do you have a link for your down hill ski helmet.
>
> It just might be what I'm looking for with my new bike.



It was a Giro Fuse. Amazon has them for $96, $14 less than I paid a
year ago.



Scott Ellington
Madison, Wisconsin
USA
Paul
2009-11-17 22:41:34 UTC
Permalink
$71.96

If this is the same one at Sierra Trading Post.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/Product.aspx?baseno=75653&plp=Giro_Fus
e_Snowsport_Helmet&utm_source=Yahoo&utm_medium=PaidSearch&utm_term=Gi
ro_Fuse_Snowsport_Helmet&utm_campaign=PMYAHOOINC9&codesProcessed=true

or

http://tinyurl.com/yzz6rrb

Regards,
Paul C
Dallas


----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Ellington" <sdelling-+***@public.gmane.org>
To: "touring list" <touring-***@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Tuesday, November 17, 2009 4:13 PM
Subject: Cold head wear


>
> On Nov 17, 2009, at 3:29 PM, David Whitmon wrote:
>
>> Do you have a link for your down hill ski helmet.
>>
>> It just might be what I'm looking for with my new bike.
>
>
>
> It was a Giro Fuse. Amazon has them for $96, $14 less than I paid a
> year ago.
>
>
>
> Scott Ellington
> Madison, Wisconsin
> USA
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Touring mailing list
> Touring-***@public.gmane.org
> Browse and search the archives: http://search.bikelist.org
> Unsubscribe or list settings:
> http://www.phred.org/mailman/options/touring
Mark Boyd
2009-11-18 00:11:16 UTC
Permalink
But only in size small. One of the drawbacks of Sierra Trading Post
;-{. Hiwever, some of their other skiing helmets are available in
other sizes.

Mark



On Tue, Nov 17, 2009 at 5:41 PM, Paul <neves77-***@public.gmane.org> wrote:
> $71.96
>
> If this is the same one at Sierra Trading Post.
>
> http://www.sierratradingpost.com/Product.aspx?baseno=75653&plp=Giro_F
us
> e_Snowsport_Helmet&utm_source=Yahoo&utm_medium=PaidSearch&utm_term=
Gi
> ro_Fuse_Snowsport_Helmet&utm_campaign=PMYAHOOINC9&codesProcessed=true
>
> or
>
> http://tinyurl.com/yzz6rrb
>
> Regards,
> Paul C
> Dallas
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Scott Ellington" <sdelling-+***@public.gmane.org>
> To: "touring list" <touring-***@public.gmane.org>
> Sent: Tuesday, November 17, 2009 4:13 PM
> Subject: Cold head wear
>
>
>>
>> On Nov 17, 2009, at 3:29 PM, David Whitmon wrote:
>>
>>> Do you have a link for your down hill ski helmet.
>>>
>>> It just might be what I'm looking for with my new bike.
>>
>>
>>
>> It was a Giro Fuse. Amazon has them for $96, $14 less than I paid a
>> year ago.
>>
>>
>>
>> Scott Ellington
>> Madison, Wisconsin
>> USA
>>
>>
>>
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MH
2009-12-07 20:17:18 UTC
Permalink
I got to try out my cold headwear this morning.

HOTHEADZ™ 6-IN-1 POLAREX FLEECE HOODS FOR
PRE-TEENS, TEENS, MEN, WOMEN - FREE SHIPPING - $11 each
http://www.glovesandthings.com/product/HOT103

There where several colors to choose from so I got black. One size fits
all and I wear a large which was just fine putting on and wearing bicycling.
My order of one hood came in the usual time via US Mail. I'm VERY happy
with it although it was only 20F with very little wind but man my neck,
head and face are all covered up with just my glasses, nose & mouth poking
out. It sure is going to be nice and warm cycling this winter.

-Mark Hoagy


MH wrote:
> I'm not to up on all this stuff for winter headgear
> so I'm very interested in hearing what you all wear.
>
> I was looking around for winter head wear and
> watched this very interesting video --
>
> Cold Weather Headgear by U.S. Cavalry (7:41)
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bg7H6h4D1Ng
>
> The balaclavas are reasonably priced I think
> http://www.uscav.com/category.aspx?catid=1515
>
> I like the Polarex® 6-In-1 Fleece Hood $10
> with several colors to choose from.
> http://www.uscav.com/Productinfo.aspx?productID=17892
>
> Happy bicycling and stay warm,
> -Mark Hoagy
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